Friday, January 13, 2017

The Eponychium's Dilemma



The Eponychium's Dilemma

By Doug Schoon, Dana Point, CA


Nail anatomy terminology is confused and there is no shortage of competing ideas and not much clarity. Everyone seems to be confused about the names for the parts of the natural nail, even doctors and scientists aren't sure which terms to use. Misinformation is abundant, so it can be very difficult to know the facts, but the facts are what we need.

I've been working behind the scenes with many of the top nail educators in the world to address this problem, for indeed it is a global problem. In doing so, I created the original version of the drawing above and based it on a strict interpretation of the medical definitions. I shared that first version with many people, including world-class scientists, dermatologists, podiatrists and pathologists. Of course, I heard many different opinions, but I was looking for hard facts and would accept nothing less. As a result, I was eventually directed to conclusive evidence that brings great clarity and finally settles a long-standing debate about the eponychium, cuticle and proximal nail fold. Here is what I've learned.

The "eponychium" is defined in medical literature as the skin that covers the nail matrix and is responsible for development of the cuticle tissue that adheres to the top of the nail plate. The proximal nail fold is defined as the fold of skin at the base of the nail plate. That much is clear, but here is the Eponychium's Dilemma- where does one end and the other begin? At last, researchers have answered this question definitively by isolating and identifying the cuticle forming area.

It was discovered that the eponychium is a much thinner layer than suspected- in fact it is surprisingly thin- approximately 0.1-0.15 mm thick or about 0.004-006 inches thick! Rather amazingly, all nail cuticle tissue comes from this thin layer of cells. How can such a surprisingly thin area make all that cuticle tissue? The prevailing thought is that the eponychium must be made of a specialized type of cell called an "adult stem cell". The same type of stem cells are suspected to form the nail matrix and produce nail plate cells. Research is underway to verify that both the eponychium and nail matrix are composed of adult stem cells which behave like factories to produce nail plates and cuticles.

One insightful description I heard was that the proximal nail fold should be viewed as a "flap" of skin that covers the matrix area and its underside is thinly covered by the eponychium. I think that paints a good picture. So, in short, the eponychium creates and releases the cuticle, which is the thin layer of dead tissue that will ride the nail plate and form a seal that prevents pathogens from entering and infecting the matrix area. This should tissue should NOT be confused with the eponychium or the proximal nail fold. They are each very different.

If you want to learn more fun, interesting and useful information about the nail and nail products, you'll love my new book, "Face-to-Face with Doug Schoon" Volume 1. Follow Doug Schoon's Brain on Facebook to be the first to know when Volume 2 is released with in depth natural nail information!

Visit www.FacetoFacewithDougSchoon.com and www.SchoonScientific.com




If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
Ask in the comments section below, Ring us @ 301 585 4770, Write to MaisieDunbar@gmail.com, or Send an inbox message to Facebook.com/maisie.dunbar





Friday, December 23, 2016

The History of Nails. What do you know and What do you need to know?



History of Nails

Don’t Know Much About History? Just when you thought school was behind you, here’s a short history lesson in nails. This article published in Kanhistique by Aileen Mallory reveals some little-known facts about the history of nail polish that you can use to impress colleagues and let clients know you’ve really done your homework:

Did you know that at one time black was the favorite color applied to fingernails, and that men — not women — wore it? A warrior of Babylon or Homo about to go to war often spent several hours having his hair lacquered and curled, his nails manicured and colored, and his lips tinted to match.

Excavations of the royal tombs at Ur of the Chaldees in Southern Babylonia unearthed an engraved, solid gold manicure set. It and the nail coloring — kohl —were well preserved. Experts claim it was used in 3200 B.C. The kohl is green and black. The use of color indicated status — black for the important, green for people of the lower classes. This status symbol prevailed for many years.

Queen Nefertiti, daughter-in-law of Tut-ankh-Amen and reigning Egyptian beauty 3,000 years ago, painted her fingernails and toenails red. Du Barry tinted hers the color of a rose.

Cleopatra’s nail color came from the juice of the henna plant, producing deep rusty shades with an undertone of gold. Henna on the nails was limited by a strict social code. Only a brave woman dared to color her nails above her “station.”

Women of lowly rank were permitted pastels only. Moving on up the social scale, nail shades grew deeper and deeper. The most brilliant colors appeared only on the royal fingertips of the queen.

Dyeing the nails to enhance the beauty of the hands went on for several centuries.

It took something simple and easily applied to appeal to American women. The answer was liquid nail polish. The first — completely colorless — was introduced in this country in 1916. A year or so later, the first bottle of rose-tinted nail polish appeared. And the vogue was on.

Cuticle remover came in 1911. The remover eliminated most of the tedious and difficult cutting of the cuticles. This made home-manicuring easier, but strangely enough, beauty salon manicures increased immediately. The promotion of cuticle remover had made women more conscious of their hands.

In 1911, less than 25% of the women in the U.S. used any manicure preparations on their nails — in beauty salons or at home. By 1939, 86% were using manicure products, and the manicuring business in salons flourished

Original source article taken from Nails Magazine



If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
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Friday, December 9, 2016

Video Blog - Hero Collections - 12/9/16



Video Blog - Hero Collections - 12/9/16





If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
Ask in the comments section below, Ring us @ 301 585 4770, Write to MaisieDunbar@gmail.com, or Send an inbox message to Facebook.com/maisie.dunbar





Friday, December 2, 2016

Video Blog - Laasfund - 12/2/16



Video Blog - Laasfund - 12/2/16





If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
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Friday, November 18, 2016

BluffaJo Cosmetics: A Brand Born in Exile Comes Home



Visit the original article on liberianobserver.com


BluffaJo Cosmetics: A Brand Born in Exile Comes Home

By: David A. Yates

After 27 years building a successful cosmetics brand in the United States, Liberian-born entrepreneur Maisie Dunbar, founder and CEO of the BluffaJo Cosmetics line, has set her sights on her home country to launch her award winning products.

“BluffaJo,” like the name Dunbar perhaps, is unmistakably Liberian. Nowhere else in the world do people use the term which describes a woman who is fashionable, sophisticated, intelligent and confident, among other fine qualities. Aiming to express these qualities and more, this is a homecoming of sorts for the brand born in exile and named in honor of the many Liberian women who defined it.

Dunbar, a renowned skin-care expert, makeup artist and a single mother, said her being in Liberia is not just to launch her products, but to also to teach other Liberians who are passionate to venture into the cosmetics business. In addition to being a mentor to today’s up and coming skin-care professionals, she is a licensed makeup artist and has been a celebrity nail and body therapist in the industry.

Skin care expert and BluffaJo CEO Maisie Dunbar (2nd from left) in the company of friends (including Henrique Caine, Vanii Baker and Veda Simpson), who came to support the launching of her brand in Liberia.

During a PowerPoint presentation at the launch of the product at a resort in Congo Town, Ms. Dunbar told the audience that she grew up in a family with an entrepreneurship background where her aunt, cousin and father were all serious about doing business.

Her aunt, Sophie Dunbar, founded the famous Sophie’s Ice Cream enterprise in Congo Town, Monrovia. Sophie’s Ice Cream was so successful that, long after it was destroyed during the Liberian civil conflict, the location remained a landmark – Sophie’s Junction and Sophie’s Road.

Maisie Dunbar attended Fame School of Nails Design and secured her license as a manicurist to do her own nails.

"When I got out of Nails School, I was just terrible because the only things I could do were manicure and pedicure and with the spirit of the Dunbar family they don't want for anything to hold us as a challenge," she said.

“My mother was my rock and I think quite a few people in here know my father, Cllr. Dunbar, who was an honest man and a serious spirit of excellence and I think that is something that resonates in my blood.

“And my hope, my faith in God, my courage is all of those things that brought me a mighty-mighty long way,” she said. “I will never give up, because failure is not an option for me.”

Dunbar is a renowned skin-care expert and makeup artist

According to her, she is passionate about bringing out the best beauty traits in her clients. She therefore educated herself extensively in her craft so that she can ensure the best ingredients go into her products and is knowledgeable of their benefits in everyday skincare.

Now being a “go-to” for celebrities for beauty tips, Dunbar said her journey was not an easy one, where she struggled to make it better for herself and didn’t just happen for her overnight.

In 2006, she said she decided to establish her own makeup line entitled Bluffa Jo Cosmetics in Silver Spring, Maryland in the United States.

BluffaJo products are sold primarily from the Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge, a fashion, beauty and wellness business where she does most of her work from. She, along with her team of experts, continues to offer the best in original beauty treatment and holistic health care innovations at her spa lounge.

Dunbar is currently exploring distribution opportunities for BluffaJo in the Liberian market. The cosmetics line also has a strong presence in Ghana, making it easy and affordable to be available in Liberia locally.

Inspired to create her brand as she studied the connection between fashion and beauty and how it related to everyday life, this bonafide BluffaJo now wears many hats with grace. Her handiwork and BluffaJo has been featured in reputable industry magazines, on stage, CD covers, advertising campaigns,’ television, and other media outlets.

Visit the original article on liberianobserver.com




If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
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Friday, November 4, 2016

Succulent Nails, the latest in Nail Trends



Succulent Nails, the latest in Nail Trends

Why make nail art when you can grow it? Recently gaining attention among nail art enthusiasts and professionals around the world is a new technique using plants for their natural decor as nail art accessories. More specifically targeted is the Succulent, sometimes called fat plants for its ability to retain water in arid climate conditions, introduced and fashioned by Australian Botanical Artist, Roz Borg.

Her process of making an artistic Succulent manicure is pretty simple. She uses Oasis Floral Adhesive, a glue designed for plants, to fasten a portion of Succulent to Acrylic Nails. Only after the special plant glue dries does she then attach the combined Acrylic-Succulent to her own natural nail bed. Follow this process patiently and the result can leave you with finger nails practically drowning in rich plant life. And I do mean life. The floral adhesives will safely wear off eventually, and the remaning pieces of plant are virile enough to make more baby Succulents.

Visit Roz Borg's Instagram for more pictures of her work




If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
Ask in the comments section below, Ring us @ 301 585 4770, Write to MaisieDunbar@gmail.com, or Send an inbox message to Facebook.com/maisie.dunbar





Friday, October 21, 2016

Video Blog - Manicure in Canada with Cheryl Thibault pt.4 - 10/21/16



Video Blog - Manicure in Canada with Cheryl Thibault pt.4 - 10/21/16





If you have a question for Maisie Dunbar, founder/owner of the Global, Award-Winning Maisie Dunbar Spa Lounge featuring Bluffajo Cosmetics, you can:
Ask in the comments section below, Ring us @ 301 585 4770, Write to MaisieDunbar@gmail.com, or Send an inbox message to Facebook.com/maisie.dunbar